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Antioxidants - vs - Free Radicals - Immune System





Free radicals are harmful, unstable substances that develop after oxidation, a naturally occurring process of the body. Free radicals are not harmful in themselves. In fact, they can be beneficial. The only problem is they do not distinguish between healthy and harmful molecules so that there is a great possibility that they would also "attack" your other healthy cells, causing massive cellular damage, tissue damage, and eventually resulting in a chronic disease or disorder, such as aging. 

"This is significant because free radicals can destroy cell membranes and damage DNA, and may be a root cause of certain types of cancer, heart disease, and even the aging process itself." The findings of this study on antioxidant red grapes may also help explain the scientific logic behind the French paradox - why the French have less risk of heart disease even when they eat the richest types of food. 

In this article, we will attempt to answer all your questions about antioxidant and free radicals, plus help you understand why it is so important to include rich sources of antioxidant nutrients in your daily diet. A Little Background on Chemical Bonding When talking about antioxidant and free radicals, we can't help but touch a little on biochemistry. 

Some antioxidant antiaging you might have heard of include: Vitamin A Vitamin B-6 Vitamin B-12 Vitamin C Vitamin E Beta carotene Folic acid Selenium All these antioxidant antiaging can be found in the food that you eat everyday. The best sources are usually fresh fruits and vegetables. If you can't obtain all the antioxidant antiaging nutrients that you need from food, your doctor may recommend using supplements to make up for any deficiencies. 

But just as the body naturally produces free radicals, it also has a means to defend against its harmful effects. Antioxidant enzymes are chemical substances found in plants that act on free radicals. Antioxidant enzymes work in several ways. For one, they may reduce the energy of the free radical or give up some of their electrons for its use, thereby causing it to become stable. 

, who first proposed the theory in the 1950s. Since then, scientists and researchers have sought to understand the body's oxidation process and free radicals contribute in its acceleration. It seemed that these so-called free radicals are rogue oxygen molecules that are highly unstable and which have harmful effects to the body.