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How antioxidants work





Plants are where we get most of our foods and our medicines, relying on them almost entirely for developing our bodies to their full potential and at the same time reducing the causes of degenerative diseases. Recently, scientists have discovered the substance responsible for many of the health benefits we've been receiving from plants. 

Antioxidants protect the body from harmful, excess free radicals, sweeping them up before they can cause damage. These days, when we talk about antioxidants, the first thing that comes to people's minds is "supplements." However, studies on antioxidant supplements are for the most part inconclusive and so far, no one study has come up with the same results during antioxidant supplements tests. 

The Benefits of Super Antioxidants The job of super antioxidants is to hunt down free radicals but not to eliminate them. No. But to neutralize them so they'll stop their disease-causing rampaging. Literary tools aside, super antioxidants do indeed react against the harmful effects of free radicals by stopping them from reacting with the molecules in the first place. 

Free Radicals - What are they? Now, I'm sure you know what free radicals are. This is probably not the first time you've heard about it. But for the sake of those who have only just stumbled on the term, free radicals are those unstable chemical substances that are highly reactive and are by-products of the process of oxidation in the body. 

The group of researchers who conducted the study say that a compound extracted from the seeds of red grapes called Activin (tm) is that substance with powerful antioxidant red grapes properties. Because of its apparent powerful benefits, Activin was dubbed as the "super" antioxidant red grapes. 

Published online on April 6 in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the newest study on dietary antioxidants was the first to look at honey's effect on human blood. With the use of a much more precise method than the one used in 1999, the study found that the dietary antioxidants found in honey are equal to those in many fruits and vegetables in their ability to counter the degenerating activity of highly reactive molecules known as free radicals.